Dow Center for Multicultural and Community Studies

Established in 1972, the Minorities Resource/Research Center was one of the first centers of its kind in an academic library. Although the name has changed over the years, it has always been dedicated to resources and instruction related to the intersections of culture, race and ethnicity.

In 2001, representatives from Dow Chemical, K-State and the community dedicated the Dow Chemical Multicultural Resource Center, supported by a generous endowment from Dow Chemical. In 2012, the center was renamed the Dow Center for Multicultural and Community Studies.

The endowment supports campus and community diversity programming, multicultural collections and instructional and outreach services. The Dow Center is now located on the 2nd floor of Hale Library.

 

Apply for funding

The endowment supports cultural programming on campus and in the community that is compatible with the Center’s mission. K-State affiliated organizations and groups that sponsor cultural and educational events may be eligible for funds. Funds are not available to individuals. Funding decisions are based on fund availability and are at the discretion of the Libraries.

Apply for funding to support your event or program

 

Our mission and vision

Mission

To provide a space for students, faculty, staff and the community to explore human diversity, the changing landscape of American demographics and the impact of globalization.

Vision

The Dow Center for Multicultural and Community Studies hopes to be a relevant and useful service to advance a deep and meaningful understanding of multiculturalism and diversity in order to create mutual awareness, respect and open a pathway for dialog.

 

The We Are the Dream mural

The original We Are the Dream mural was painted during a period from October 1978 - October 1980 by various multicultural student groups on the wall of the Minorities Resource/Research Center.

The original mural is still in tact and visible on the 4th floor of Hale Library. After a fire in 2018 threatened to destroy the mural, conservationists were able to restore the mural and return it to its original location.

The idea of a mural resulted from a discussion by Anthony Seals, Black Student Union; Teresa Guillen, Movimiento Estudiantil de Chicanos de Aztlan (MEChA, a Hispanic student group); Frank Kekahbah, Native American Indian Student Body; and Antonia Pigno, Director of the Center in the spring of 1978. Student groups and individuals contributing to the original mural include artists: Travis Mosley, Willie McDonald, and Harold Carter; with help from: Teresa Guillen, Tom Pratt, Lee Willis, Edgar Beck, Paula Carter, and Rita Schwermann; a mural committee of: Anthony Seals, Isaac Turner, Frank Kekahbah, Jeannie Sandoval, Teresa Guillen, Hector Medina, and Rita Schwermann; and donors: Harold Carter, Ernest Carter, Richard Rohrer, Hector Medina, Black Student Union, MEChA, Cook Paint, Antonia Pigno, Dr. James Boyer and Cherri Tippet.